Best winning storylines for the 2017 Open Championship

It’s a well documented fact that golf is on a run of first time major winners. Since Zach Johnson’s triumph in a playoff at the 2015 Open Championship, seven different players have taken home a major title for the first time, from long awaited winners like Sergio Garcia and Henrik Stenson to young thoroughbreds like Brooks Koepka, and the crazy thing is that it’s very easy to see this trend continue for the next year or so without even batting an eye.

Jon Rahm, Hideki Matsuyama, Justin Thomas, Rickie Fowler and many more could win a major and it wouldn’t shock anyone. Those four players are all vying for the Open this week at Royal Birkdale, and would all provide a tremendous storyline if they were able to come out on top. That’s the point of this post: who would provide the best winning storyline if they were able to capture the Claret Jug this week? Here’s my top ten.

Note: The caveat here is that I’m only listing players that I think have a legitimate chance to win the tournament, so as much as Mark O’Meara winning would be amazing, he won’t be here.

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The 18: DeChambeau triumphs at the JDC

The 18 is a look at eighteen stories from the previous week or so in the world of golf, and they will usually be on stories that I didn’t dedicate a full post towards. Expect a combination of thoughts, GIFs, images and anything else that caught my eye from the past seven days. Some will be longer thoughts, and others will be no more than a line or two. 

The 18 will (hopefully) run every Tuesday. You can catch up on previous versions of The 18 right here.

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June 30th Mailbag: Peak Tiger in 2017, Rory and Steph Curry

As always, keep the questions coming on Twitter or send them to my e-mail: adamrsarson@gmail.com

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The 18: Spieth’s win and the Phil/Bones split

The 18 is a look at eighteen stories from the previous week or so in the world of golf, and they will usually be on stories that I didn’t dedicate a full post towards. Expect a combination of thoughts, GIFs, images and anything else that caught my eye from the past seven days. Some will be longer thoughts, and others will be no more than a line or two. 

The 18 will (hopefully) run every Tuesday. You can catch up on previous versions of The 18 right here.

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Rory McIlroy, expectations and the talent influx

If you follow golf in any way, it seems like it’s impossible to not have some kind of take on Rory McIlroy. With his otherworldly talent and stature in the game, it makes sense that he would draw a lot of attention and over the last couple of weeks, he has definitely given people plenty to talk about. From his recurring rib injury and subsequent return at Erin Hills, to his equipment changes and his Twitter dunking on Steve Elkington, Rory has kept all of the #content writers busy and that’s to say nothing of his performance on the golf course over the past few months.

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The 18: Notes from the U.S. Open

The 18 is a look at eighteen stories from the previous week or so in the world of golf, and they will usually be on stories that I didn’t dedicate a full post towards. Expect a combination of thoughts, GIFs, images and anything else that caught my eye from the past seven days. Some will be longer thoughts, and others will be no more than a line or two. 

The 18 will (hopefully) run every Tuesday. You can catch up on previous versions of The 18 right here.

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Brooks Koepka, Erin Hills and a non-traditional U.S. Open

The 2017 U.S. Open was not a traditional U.S. Open.

Brooks Koepka walked away as the winner, posting a 16-under par total at Erin Hills, making him only the third player to win the U.S. Open with a score that reached double digits under par. He joined Rory McIlroy, who also shot -16 and dominated a wet and soft Congressional in 2011, and the LOL performance from Tiger in 2000 when he ended up fifteen clear of the field at -12. In fact, coming into the week, only Rory and Tiger had ever finished a U.S. Open in double digits under par. No one else in 2000 or 2011 was able to crack that barrier, nor was anyone else in the history of a championship that dates back to 1895. Hogan, Nicklaus, Jones, Palmer, Player, and literally everyone else not named Tiger or Rory have been able to get to that kind of number at the U.S. Open and stay there. Now, you can add Koepka to that list. You can also add Hideki Matsuyama, Brian Harman, Tommy Fleetwood, Rickie Fowler, Bill Haas and Xander Schauffele to that group. You can probably also add a lot of money to your bank account if this question somehow comes up in conversation at a bar one night.

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The 18: Berger repeats in Memphis

The 18 is a look at eighteen stories from the previous week or so in the world of golf, and they will usually be on stories that I didn’t dedicate a full post towards. Expect a combination of thoughts, GIFs, images and anything else that caught my eye from the past seven days. Some will be longer thoughts, and others will be no more than a line or two. 

The 18 will (hopefully) run every Tuesday. You can catch up on previous versions of The 18 right here.

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The 18: Duf Daddy wins the Memorial

The 18 is a look at eighteen stories from the previous week or so in the world of golf, and they will usually be on stories that I didn’t dedicate a full post towards. Expect a combination of thoughts, GIFs, images and anything else that caught my eye from the past seven days. Some will be longer thoughts, and others will be no more than a line or two. 

The 18 will (hopefully) run every Tuesday. I missed last week due to a combination of being on vacation/getting my wisdom teeth out, but I should be back on track now. You can catch up on previous versions of The 18 right here.

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On Alex Noren’s BMW PGA Championship win and the OWGR

The Official World Golf Rankings are not a perfect system.

Thousands of players take part in hundreds of tournaments across nineteen eligible tours each year, and while the rankings are weighted towards recent performance, points earned in events from the previous two years are accounted for in the rankings. Field strength, based on the quality of tour and number of top players playing in the event, determine the amount of points available each week. If it sounds complicated, it’s probably because it kinda is, but when you involve that many players and tours in a ranking system, chances are you’re not going to be able to come up with something that’s both simple and effective. I have no idea if world number 52 Yuta Ikeda is a better player than number 103 Bud Cauley, and I don’t think anyone can really come up with a system that tells us that definitively when they don’t play in the same events.

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